2019 SVMA Conference Speakers

 


Stephan Carey

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.
Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Therapy

Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Therapy

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Tuscany Room

An important step in the pathogenesis of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease (CIRD) involves the colonization of the upper airway mucosa by primary respiratory pathogens. An understanding of the complex relationship between these primary respiratory pathogens and the respiratory immune system is crucial to the development of strategies to effectively treat and prevent CIRD. The objective of this presentation is to provide an update on our current understanding of the interactions between the canine immune system and the classical and emerging respiratory pathogens underlying this disease complex as they relate to clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy.
Canine Influenza Virus: The Immunology and Biology of Disease Prevention

Canine Influenza Virus: The Immunology and Biology of Disease Prevention

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Tuscany Room

Two important subtypes of Influenza Virus, H3N8 and H3N2 CIV, are currently circulating among dogs in North America. To date, these are the only two subtypes known to be capable of infecting and causing disease in dogs and capable of being transmitted from an infected dog to a vulnerable dog. While these two viruses have similar reported morbidity and mortality rates, the transmission, spread, and geographical distribution of these viruses have some important differences that can impact strategies aimed at disease prevention. This session will review the general biology of influenza viruses, provide an update on the pathogenesis of CIV in dogs, and discuss the mechanisms that provide natural and vaccine-induced protection from disease.
Canine Influenza Virus Therapy: Individual and Herd Management

Canine Influenza Virus Therapy: Individual and Herd Management

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Tuscany Room

Canine Influenza Virus is an important source of morbidity and mortality to dogs in Canada and the US. Because of its short latency period, carrier state, and low herd immunity, it has been associated with recent outbreaks of respiratory disease among social or commingled dogs across North America. Because dogs either overtly or sub-clinically infected with CIV pose both medical and economic risks, it is important for veterinarians to have effective strategies to identify and manage infected dogs while also minimizing the potential for disease transmission. This session will provide updates on recommendations for identifying and screening potentially infected dogs, managing respiratory disease in individual dogs, and implementing strategies for premise control and environmental management to minimize spread of disease.

Leah Clark

MSc

Leah Clark is a Livestock and Feed Extension Specialist based out of the Agriculture Knowledge Centre in Moose Jaw. Leah has a Master of Science in Animal Science from the University of Saskatchewan focusing on Ruminant Nutrition. She graduated with a major in animal science and a minor in rangeland resources. She maintains an active interest in water quality and ruminant nutrition.
Livestock Water: An In-depth Look from Southern Saskatchewan

Livestock Water: An In-depth Look from Southern Saskatchewan

Large Animal
Sep 8/19, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
Lombardy Room

Water Quality for Livestock in Saskatchewan has proven to be variable and in some cases difficult to manage.  This Presentation will review common water quality issues livestock producers face. The main focus will be on dissolved sulphates, production effects, complicating factors, management and where we go from here. There will be three years of summer water quality sample data that have been taken from Southern Saskatchewan included in the presentation.

Murray Feist

MSc, PAg

Mr Murray Feist holds a Master of Science degree in Animal Science from the University of Saskatchewan specializing in ruminant nutrition. As an employee of Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture, he has 20 years of experience with the ruminant industries (cattle, bison, cervids, sheep) with his main involvement being ration formulation, extension presentations, teaching, fact-sheet publication, articles in popular literature and research and development. Currently, he is employed by the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture as Provincial Livestock Specialist for the Feed and Bison Industry located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
New (and not so new) Feeds for Ruminants: Coping with Feed Challenges

New (and not so new) Feeds for Ruminants: Coping with Feed Challenges

Large Animal
Sep 8/19, 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Lombardy Room

The feeding of livestock in western Canada can have many challenges ranging from feed shortages, feed quality issues, anti-nutriitonal factors and economic circumstance.  Primary producers may be forced to utilize feedstuffs that require some adaptation in feeding and supplementation practices.  This session will identify some examples of specific feed issues that arise in western Canada that are of concern to veterinarians who care for bovines and other ruminants. 

Greg Harasen

DVM

Dr Greg Harasen graduated from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in 1983. Shortly after the start of his practice career, Dr Harasen began developing a special interest in orthopedic surgery. He is well known for his expertise, having lectured to veterinarians and veterinary ppechnologists and publishing several articles. Dr Harasen is a past-president of the SVMA and a recipient of it’s 2006 Meritorious Service Award. He was named the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association’s Small Animal Practitioner of the Year in 2002. Dr Greg Harasen does orthopedic consultations and surgery on a part-time basis. He is also a Certified Sommelier, having attained his level 3 certification in wines from the Wine and Spirit Education Trust (WSET) in London, England.
UnWINEd for Wellness

UnWINEd for Wellness

Plenary
Sep 6/19, 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Campania Room

Is it a social event or is it a CE session? The answer is ... YES, it's both! This year's wellness event features wine tasting education presented by Dr Greg Harasen, one of our member DVMs who is also a Certified Sommelier. This wine tasting 'practicum' will be presented as part of a larger discussion about hobbies and personal interests and their importance to work-life balance for veterinary professionals.
sponsored by Summit Veterinary Pharmacy
What I've Learned in 15 Years on VIN

What I've Learned in 15 Years on VIN

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuscany Room

Dr Greg Harasen has been an orthopedic surgery consultant for 15 years on the Veterinary Information Network during which time he is sure that he’s learned many times more than he’s ever taught!  Over the years the same dozen or so questions and problems keep coming up again and again and again…and again….  It seems like maybe these are important questions and topics that most practitioners would like to know about.  Through a presentation of VIN postings Dr Harasen will cover these common questions and generate discussion about common, everyday, important orthopedic diagnoses.
The Cat…The Forgotten Orthopedic Patient

The Cat…The Forgotten Orthopedic Patient

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
Tuscany Room

An overwhelming majority of the veterinary orthopedic literature concerns the dog.  It’s only in recent years that we’ve come to recognize that cats have their own orthopedic concerns and are not simply “small dogs.”  Dr Harasen will cover the common feline orthopedic conditions and what we can do about them. 

Angela MacKay

DVM, DABVP Equine Practice

Dr MacKay obtained her DVM from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in 2014, and then went on to a one-year surgical internship at Oakridge Equine Hospital in Edmond, Oklahoma. Following the internship, Dr MacKay returned to WCVM for a Master of Science and Clinical Residency in Equine Field Service under the auspices of the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners. She successfully completed her residency in July 2018 and passed the ABVP board exam in October 2018. Dr MacKay is currently a clinical associate in the WCVM Equine Field Service department. Her interests include sports medicine, lameness, and diagnostic imaging.
Protocols for Equine Standing Sedation

Protocols for Equine Standing Sedation

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Lombardy Room

Appropriate standing sedation is critical for personnel and animal safety when performing standing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the horse. Multiple drugs and drug combinations are available for use. Common standing sedation protocols will be discussed with practical situations in mind, highlighting drug mechanism of action, drug dosages, and potential adverse effects.

Jennifer Pearson

DVM, DACT

Dr Jennifer Pearson graduated from Oregon State University with a Bachelor’s of Science in biology and animal science. Afterwards, she received her DVM from Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Upon graduating, she started a one year internship at Cornell University in Ambulatory and then stayed on for a residency in Ambulatory and Theriogenology. Jennifer is currently pursuing a PhD at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine investigating the impacts of calving management, calf risk factors, and difficult calving on the health and performance of beef calves. She became board certified through the American College of Theriogenology in 2018. Her research interests include peri-partum diseases and neonatal care in cattle.
Pain Mitigation for Painful Calf Procedures

Pain Mitigation for Painful Calf Procedures

Large Animal
Sep 8/19, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Lombardy Room

Review of pain pathways and types of analgesics; producer perceptions of pain mitigation; current literature and practices for pain mitigation in castration, dehorning and branding practices.
Pain Mitigation for the Adult Bovoid

Pain Mitigation for the Adult Bovoid

Large Animal
Sep 8/19, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Lombardy Room

Current literature and practices for pain mitigation for dystocias, lameness conditions, mastitis, pneumonia, and surgical procedures.

Kate Robinson

DVM, BSc

Dr Robinson is a field service clinician at U of S’s Veterinary Medical Center and a board-certified equine practice specialist. Dr Robinson is an assistant professor at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, where she teaches in a variety of courses, from introductory horse handling labs (first year students) to specialized radiology labs (third year students). Dr Robinson has a keen interest in teaching fourth year students during their clinical rotations; her clinical interests include lameness and diagnostic imaging (radiology, ultrasonography), as well as podiatry and routine preventative health care.
Veterinary-Farrier Relationships and a Look at the 4feet Continuing Education Group

Veterinary-Farrier Relationships and a Look at the 4feet Continuing Education Group

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Lombardy Room

Healthy, respectful relationships between veterinarians and farriers are vital so that we may best serve our mutual patients and clients. However, differences in opinion may put strain on these professional relationships. Dr Robinson will draw on personal experience, as well as recommendations from experts such as Dr Stephen O’Grady, to explore the relationship between veterinarians and farriers. Concepts such as case management, treatment decisions, and conflict resolution will be discussed.
sponsored by Dechra Veterinary Products
Radiography for Equine Podiatry Cases

Radiography for Equine Podiatry Cases

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Lombardy Room

High quality, well-positioned radiographs of the equine foot are key for the diagnosis of a multitude of hoof-related problems. Radiographs of the foot may assist farriers in carrying out therapeutic recommendations, and are a great way to monitor response to treatment over time. Radiographs may even be useful when making trim or shoeing changes in a healthy foot. In this session radiographic techniques, typical views, measurements, and pitfalls will be discussed.
sponsored by Dechra Veterinary Products
The 'Barefoot vs Shod' Debate: Can one size fit all?

The 'Barefoot vs Shod' Debate: Can one size fit all?

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Lombardy Room

Amongst veterinarians, farriers, trimmers, and horse owners, there is much debate as to whether horses should be shod or barefoot. Unfortunately, the scientific literature on this topic is limited, and much of the available information is anecdotal. Dr Robinson will highlight the scientific evidence for and against both sides of this contentious topic and will welcome input from the audience.
sponsored by Dechra Veterinary Products

Chris Sanchez

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Sanchez received her DVM degree from the University of Florida in 1995. She then completed an internship at Equine Medical Associates in Edmond, OK. She finished a residency in Large Animal Internal Medicine at the University of Florida and became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (LAIM) in 1999. She completed her PhD at the University of Florida in 2003 and is currently a professor of large animal internal medicine and Chief Medical Officer of the Large Animal Hospital. Dr Sanchez's clinical interests include general equine internal medicine, neonatology, and gastroenterology. Her research focus has been veterinary gastroenterology, with a special interest in visceral pain and gastric ulceration.
Pain Management in the Horse

Pain Management in the Horse

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Lombardy Room

This talk will discuss pain recognition and principles of management in the horse. A case-based approach will be used to discuss “top down” and “bottom up” forms of management. For example, when can local therapy decrease the amount of systemic therapy needed?
Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome

Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Lombardy Room

This talk will discuss differences in response to therapy between horses with squamous and glandular ulceration. We will discuss new work on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the problems.
Critical Care of Equine Neonates

Critical Care of Equine Neonates

Large Animal
Sep 7/19, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
Lombardy Room

Treat foals in your practice? This talk will cover the basics (and some advanced care) of the most common problems. What has changed in the last few years and what has stayed tried and true? Come to find out!

Lorraine Serhienko

RVT

Lorraine Serhienko, RVT is the SVMA’s Regulatory and Education Coordinator. Her background as an RVT, both in clinical practice and at educational institutions, makes Lorraine, a livestock producer who also operates a 2000+ acre grain farm with her family, a considerable asset to the Association. Lorraine volunteers doing remote veterinary services, assisted with animal rescue during the Fort McMurray fires of 2016 and helped coordinate veterinary support during the SW Saskatchewan fires of 2017. Lorraine is involved with a committee that is working with emergency preparedness and response regarding animals for the province of Saskatchewan.
Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness

Plenary
Sep 6/19, 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Umbria Room

What was it like being in the Fort McMurray evacuation zone and dealing with all the animals left behind? How did we get through the red tape and what steps were taken to get all those animals out? Do you know what happened in the background during the southwest Saskatchewan fires of 2017? Lorraine will be telling you all about natural disasters in the prairies and what SVMA has developed in the wake of emergency situations over the last few years. Lorraine will talk about what the processes are for dealing with emergencies, how and why the SVMA is involved, and what other agencies we are working with. Finally, Lorraine will look at what the future holds for natural disasters and animals in Saskatchewan.

Laura Solano

DVM, PhD

Dr Laura Solano is veterinarian, researcher, daughter of a dairy farmer and a consultant in the area of dairy animal health and wellbeing. She completed her veterinary degree in Costa Rica, her home country, and a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Calgary. Her doctoral research involved identifying farm management practices aimed at controlling lameness and optimizing cow comfort in Canadian dairy herds. Laura is currently the principal consultant of Farm Animal Care Associates, where she continues her work delivering dairy animal care extension & outreach programs in English and Spanish, with a special focus on foot health.
What are farms with low lameness and body injuries doing differently?

What are farms with low lameness and body injuries doing differently?

Large Animal
Sep 8/19, 10:20 am - 11:10 am
Lombardy Room

For the past 10 years, several projects in Alberta and around the world have generated a body of knowledge in dairy cattle foot health and well-being. Based on this information and in light of our industry’s regulations and requirements to meet high standards of animal care, Laura will discuss practical and strategic approaches for reducing lameness and body injuries.
Control of Infectious Foot Lesions: Add a dose of skepticism.

Control of Infectious Foot Lesions: Add a dose of skepticism.

Large Animal
Sep 8/19, 11:20 am - 12:10 pm
Lombardy Room

From internal and external biosecurity to hygiene, footbathing, early lesion detection, antibiotic and non-antibiotic treatment… there are many ways to control, prevent and treat the most common foot lesion: digital dermatitis. With information overload, some supported by anecdotal and some supported by scientific evidence, we will discuss how these findings can be applied to improve the control of infectious lesions.

Becky Taylor

RVT, MA

Becky Taylor has been active in her career as an RVT for over 20 years. She worked in a mixed animal practice and then joined the teaching team at Olds College in the AHT Program. Becky holds a certificate in Veterinary Hospital Management and has completed extensive training in leadership and communication. Becky’s passion for working with people has led to her devoting much of her professional development to learning and teaching communication skills in an applied manner. She has been active on provincial and national veterinary organizations as well as on various committees at Olds College. Becky completed a Master of Arts in Professional Communication through Royal Roads University which included a final research paper on the communication practices of RVTs. An avid advocate for practicing communication skills within the veterinary profession, she teaches courses in communication which includes lecture and simulations to all students in the animal health programs at Olds College (AHT, VMR, VTA) as well as coaches & examines veterinary students at UCVM in simulated communication settings. She has spoken extensively on the topic of communication to various groups in the animal health industry and is well respected for her enthusiasm and knowledge in that area.
RVTs: The Hidden Treasure of Veterinary Practice

RVTs: The Hidden Treasure of Veterinary Practice

Plenary
Sep 6/19, 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Umbria Room

It's no secret that Veterinary Technologists are a valuable asset to any veterinary team; their skill, their passion for animal care, their hard work ethic, their technical abilities, their problem solving skills are all highly desirable traits. Are practices leveraging this skill set and attributes in the most effective way? How can we elevate the role of VTs in practice ? Increase profitability? Retain staff? Utilize the strength areas of RVTs? It's simple; be strategic about hiring, monitor and encourage performance, promote continuing education and empower. This session will examine the many roles that RVTs can and do have in veterinary practice and will explore and discuss best practices for leveraging staff in a positive and rewarding way.

Mike Willard

DVM

Dr Willard is a 1975 graduate of the Texas A&M University, College of Veterinary Medicine. He did his internship and Masters degree at Kansas State University and his internal medicine residency at Michigan State University. After that, Dr Willard held faculty appointments at Michigan State University, Mississippi State University, and Texas A&M University. He is currently Senior Professor and Professor Emeritus of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and specializes in gastroenterology, hepatology, pancreatology and endoscopy (flexible and rigid). Dr Willard has extensive experience with protein-losing enteropathies and gastrointestinal problems of racing Alaskan sled dogs. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Dr Willard has given over 3,500 hours of invited post-graduate continuing education lectures (nationally and internationally), has over 80 refereed publications, and has over 140 book chapters in print.
Regurgitation: Much More than just Megaesophagus

Regurgitation: Much More than just Megaesophagus

Companion Animal
Sep 8/19, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Tuscany Room

A case-based discussion including relative common esophageal diseases that are typically missed in most practices such as segmental esophagus weakness, esophageal weakness presenting as respiratory disease without any regurgitation or other GI sign, esophagitis, esophageal obstruction, and hiatal hernia.  All of these diseases can be expected to be seen in most busy practices each year.
GI Ulcers/Erosions: Common, but don’t expect to see hematemesis or anemia.

GI Ulcers/Erosions: Common, but don’t expect to see hematemesis or anemia.

Companion Animal
Sep 8/19, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Tuscany Room

A case-based discussion on gastric ulceration/erosion and other causes of GI bleeding.  Most dogs with ulcers to not vomit blood or become anemic.  Many dogs with gastric disease do not even vomit.  Gastric protective therapy is typically done poorly, and there is a lot of new information out on proton-pump inhibitors.
Chronic Small Bowel Disease: IBD is not the most common diagnosis.

Chronic Small Bowel Disease: IBD is not the most common diagnosis.

Companion Animal
Sep 8/19, 10:20 am - 11:10 am
Tuscany Room

Most chronic small bowel diarrhea is caused by dietary-responsive and antibiotic-responsive disease, not IBD (i.e., steroid-requiring disease).  Good therapeutic trials are often the best diagnostic tool; intestinal biopsy has a place but it often done at the wrong time in the wrong way to the wrong patient.
Protein Losing Enteropathies: Low albumin is not a death sentence.

Protein Losing Enteropathies: Low albumin is not a death sentence.

Companion Animal
Sep 8/19, 11:20 am - 12:10 pm
Tuscany Room

Intestinal lymphangiectasia is much more common than most people realize.  If diagnosed in time, the prognosis is every good, but diagnosis can be complex.  Abdominal ultrasound can be very helpful if you know what lesion to look for.  Therapy consists of ultra-low fat (NOT low fat) diets and strong anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive drugs. 
Chronic Large Bowel Diarrhea

Chronic Large Bowel Diarrhea

Companion Animal
Sep 8/19, 1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Tuscany Room

Dietary and antibacterial diseases are the most common causes.  However, there are some very specific bacterial diseases that require very specific therapy.  Also, fungal and algal diseases are not really limited to specific geographical locations like the textbooks say they are.
Chronic Liver Disease in Dogs: You can actually make a big difference.

Chronic Liver Disease in Dogs: You can actually make a big difference.

Companion Animal
Sep 8/19, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
Tuscany Room

Chronic hepatitis is the most common chronic hepatic disease of dogs.  Early diagnosis can make you into a hero, but you are going to have to biopsy the liver.  Liver biopsy must be done early enough (i.e., before you are absolutely certain the liver is severely diseased) and correctly (i.e., NOT with an ultrasound guided tru cut needle.

Danielle Zwueste

DVM, DACVIM

Danielle Zwueste graduated form the Western College of Veterinary Medicine in 2012. She completed a small animal rotating internship with the Veterinary Emergency Clinic in Toronto, Canada in 2013. Her residency training in neurology and neurosurgery was done at the University of California, Davis from 2013 -2016, after which she achieved board certification status. She returned to the WCVM as an assistant professor in September, 2016. Her areas of interest include intracranial disease and feline neurology.
The Neurological Examination Revisited

The Neurological Examination Revisited

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Tuscany Room

The neurological examination is the foundation for diagnosing neurological diseases and differentiating them from conditions that may mimic neurological dysfunction. Being able to accurately localize lesions will help clinicians determine reasonable differentials and recommend diagnostic plans. The neurological examination can also provide prognostic information. This presentation will review the structure and technique of a complete neurological examination, as well as how to interpret any abnormalities.
Neurological Emergencies

Neurological Emergencies

Companion Animal
Sep 7/19, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Tuscany Room

Neurological emergencies can be a source of stress for the practitioner and veterinary health care team. Cases require intensive systemic supportive care, such as fluid therapy, oxygen and analgesia, in addition to specific management of the underlying neurological problem. This lecture will review fundamental principles involved in managing common neurological emergencies, such as head trauma, seizures and acute spinal cord disease.