CE Program

 
 



The 2018 SVMA Conference CE program (1004-32521) is RACE approved by the AAVSB to offer a total of 36.0 CE credits, with 16.0 hours being available to any one veterinarian or registered vetererinary technologist, or 19.5 with a wet lab. This approval is valid in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE; however, participants are responsible for ascertaining each board's CE requirements.

Conference Program At-a-Glance

Printable CE Listings                                  

WET LABS

Rehabilitation for Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

Romany Pinto

About the Speaker

Romany Pinto, DVM, CVA, CCRP

Dr Romany Pinto is a clinical associate at the Veterinary Medical Centre (VMC). Her areas of practice include small animal rehabilitation and acupuncture. One of her main areas of interest includes helping working or sporting dogs return to their previous activities after injury. Originally from Coquitlam, BC, Dr Pinto received her DVM from WCVM in 2006. After graduating, she spent three years as a clinical associate in anesthesia at the VMC. Dr Pinto is a certified veterinary acupuncturist (CVA) from the Chi Institute of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine in Reddick, Fla. She is also a certified canine rehabilitation practitioner (CCRP) from the University of Tennessee. Dr Pinto enjoys competing in agility trials with her border collie-husky cross. She is also a certified coach and former international competitor in equestrian vaulting.

DVM, CVA, CCRP

Sep 6/18, 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Western College of Veterinary Medicine
This lab provides an introduction to rehabilitation for both surgically and conservatively-managed cases of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). It will address analgesia, modalities and therapeutic exercises, focusing on techniques easily performed in general practice. It will also go over the general progression of exercises and useful milestones for knowing when to increase the difficulty of exercises. Participants will have the opportunity to practice measurement of joint angles, muscle palpation, passive range of motion, stretching and therapeutic exercises in healthy dogs and dogs with CCLR. We will also include a brief demonstration of the underwater treadmill. Dr Kira Penney will assist with lab segment. Maximum 20 people.

Equine Dentistry in Ambulatory Practice

Kate Robinson

About the Speaker

Kate Robinson, DVM, BSc

Dr Robinson is a field service clinician at U of S’s Veterinary Medical Center and a board-certified equine practice specialist. Dr Robinson is an assistant professor at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, where she teaches in a variety of courses, from introductory horse handling labs (first year students) to specialized radiology labs (third year students). Dr Robinson has a keen interest in teaching fourth year students during their clinical rotations; her clinical interests include lameness and diagnostic imaging (radiology, ultrasonography), as well as podiatry and routine preventative health care.

DVM, BSc

Sep 6/18, 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Western College of Veterinary Medicine
This wet lab will focus on routine as well as advanced equine dentistry procedures in a field practice setting.  Participants will have the opportunity to review basic dentition on skulls and as well as cadaveric heads, practice charting, and use of the PowerFloat®.  Participants will practice basic dental radiography, which can be useful in a field setting for identifying disease processes in teeth which may not be apparent on oral exam.  Participants will also practice local anesthetic techniques and intra-oral extractions.  Active hands-on learning is of utmost importance for these techniques, and as such, this lab has no formal lecture component. Dr Robinson will be assisted by Dr Michelle Husulak. Scrubs are recommended. Maximum 20 people.

Sponsored by scil Animal Care Co





PLENARY SESSIONS

'50 Shades of Beige'

Tina Varughese

About the Speaker

Tina Varughese,

Tina Varughese is a professional speaker and trainer specializing in cross-cultural communication, work-life balance and inclusive leadership. She has worked with Alberta Employment and Immigration where she spearheaded international recruitment missions in response to Alberta’s labour shortage. She is a contributing writer for the Human Resource Institute of Alberta’s Network magazine, Calgary Real Estate News, and Home to Home magazine. She is a professional member of the Canadian Association of Professional Speakers. (Tina has been the face of diversity, literally, when she was chosen to be in Dove’s Campaign for Real Beauty representing beauty in diversity.)


Sep 7/18, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
East Room
Everybody can benefit from communicating more effectively. However, when 20% of Canada’s population is foreign-born (and much higher in urban centres), communicating with the cross-cultural advantage is arguably one of the most important types of communication to understand in the 21st century. Veterinary practices, with an ever more culturally-diverse client base plus an increasingly multicultural workforce, will benefit greatly from this topic.

Sponsored by IDEXX and WDDC



VCPR Case Discussion

About the Speaker

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Sep 7/18, 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
East Room
Understanding the VCPR is more important now than ever. All of us have questions about creating and maintaining a proper VCPR with clients. This hour will cover handling VCPR correctly in common and uncommon situations. Bring your questions!



LARGE ANIMAL SESSIONS

Honeybee Biology and Basic Beekeeping Practices

Elemir Simko

About the Speaker

Elemir Simko, DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Since 1998, Dr Elemir Simko, Anatomic Pathologist, has been a faculty member in the Department of Veterinary Pathology at the WCVM involved in teaching, diagnostics and research. His research interest is in pathogenesis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Recently, he established a Honey Bee Health research and teaching program at the WCVM.

DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Sep 8/18, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
South Room
A brief overview of honey bee biology and beekeeping practices in Western Canada will be presented with special emphases on those aspects that are related to honey bee health and diseases.

Most Important Honeybee Diseases in Saskatchewan

Elemir Simko

About the Speaker

Elemir Simko, DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Since 1998, Dr Elemir Simko, Anatomic Pathologist, has been a faculty member in the Department of Veterinary Pathology at the WCVM involved in teaching, diagnostics and research. His research interest is in pathogenesis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Recently, he established a Honey Bee Health research and teaching program at the WCVM.

DVM, DVSc, DACVP

Sep 8/18, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
South Room
Emphasis will be on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy and prevention of most common diseases (e.g. Varroosis, Nosemosis, American foulbrood, European foulbrood). The objective of both lectures is to provide basic information that is important to understand for all future "Bee Vets"

When Conversations Are Tough: Managing Challenging Conversations with Rural Clients

Erin Wasson

About the Speaker

Erin Wasson, MSW RSW

Erin Wasson is a registered social worker from the University of Saskatchewan, Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM). She has spent her career working with individuals, couples, groups, and communities as a clinician and resource. Currently, her primary focus is on One Health approaches to social work practice.  These approaches are informed by the intersection of human beings, animals, and environment. Erin’s work also combines relational cultural theory and practice with interventions that explore holistic assessment and intervention. In 2014, Erin implemented Veterinary Social Work services at the WCVM, the first of its kind in Canada. In this role, she provides services to clients of the Veterinary Medical Centre; as well as resources to staff, faculty, and students. Erin has also been active in promoting resilience in the broader community. She seeks to address challenges that arise in human and animal interactions, partnering with veterinary medical associations and animal welfare organizations to facilitate workshops, in-services, and other education events.

MSW RSW

Sep 8/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
South Room
Veterinarians are trusted experts in food animal and equine medicine. Some of the more challenging calls come when the issues with a person’s herd are related to issues in a person’s home. As trusted members of agricultural communities, veterinarians are sought for psycho-social support which can often feel beyond their scope of practice. As a result, veterinarians should equip themselves with referral information for clients in cases where health is a factor. Learning how to approach clients about these issues, and familiarizing oneself support services, is key to resolving cases where client issues impact on herd health. As veterinary responsibilities grow, ability to redirect clients is also a step towards preventing or resolving identified human and animal welfare issues. Join Erin Wasson (BSW, MSW, RSW) in talking about how to get the conversation going. This talk is about when you feel like you're beyond your depth with the “touchy feely” stuff, someone’s herd is about to be or is a “wreck”, and you want to know how to pass them on to somebody else.

Tying Up Loose Ends in the Tied Up Horse

Julia Montgomery

About the Speaker

Julia Montgomery, Med Vet, PhD, DACVIM (LAIM)

Dr Montgomery holds a veterinary degree from the School of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Germany, and a PhD from the Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC), University of Prince Edward Island. After completing a large animal internal medicine residency at the same institution, Dr Montgomery was awarded diplomate status with the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (specialty of Large Animal Internal Medicine) in 2008. Dr Montgomery joined the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the WCVM as an Assistant Professor in 2013, after completing a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences. Dr Montgomery’s clinical and research interests are in the field of equine internal medicine and equine rehabilitation.

Med Vet, PhD, DACVIM (LAIM)

Sep 8/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
South Room
Dr Montgomery’s lecture will cover recommendations on diagnostic testing for horses with recurring Rhabdomyolysis and options for their long-term nutritional management.

Critical Appraisal of Evidence about Drugs

Virginia Fajt

About the Speaker

Virginia Fajt, DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Dr Virginia Fajt teaches pharmacology to undergraduates and professional students, and she collaborates on clinically-oriented research on antibiotics and other drugs in various species at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr Fajt is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Sep 8/18, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
South Room
This presentation will be a review what types of evidence support drug decisions and how to critically appraise the evidence and apply it to clinical decision-making.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



Principles of Antimicrobial Stewardship

Virginia Fajt

About the Speaker

Virginia Fajt, DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Dr Virginia Fajt teaches pharmacology to undergraduates and professional students, and she collaborates on clinically-oriented research on antibiotics and other drugs in various species at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr Fajt is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Sep 8/18, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
South Room
This presentation will focus on defining stewardship, outlining a framework for applying stewardship in practice, and reviewing some of the data on how to reduce antimicrobial resistance.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



Drug Decision-Making Scenarios

Virginia Fajt

About the Speaker

Virginia Fajt, DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Dr Virginia Fajt teaches pharmacology to undergraduates and professional students, and she collaborates on clinically-oriented research on antibiotics and other drugs in various species at Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr Fajt is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology.

DVM, PhD, DACVCP

Sep 8/18, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
South Room
This hour will highlight common uses of drugs, particularly antibiotic, and the evidence for or against their use. Possible scenarios will be perioperative use, respiratory disease, contagious abortion, and footrot in ruminants.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



When Things Go Wrong: Dealing with Surgical Complications in Alpacas

Andrew Niehaus

About the Speaker

Andrew Niehaus, DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Dr Andy Niehaus, associate professor and head of Farm Animal Surgery at Ohio State University, graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in chemical engineering. He got his DVM from Ohio State and he remained at OSU and completed an internship and residency in farm animal surgery and a Master's degree. He is a large animal Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a member of the AABP.

DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Sep 9/18, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
South Room
All veterinarians know that sometimes things go wrong despite our best efforts. Camelids are susceptible to the same complications as other animals. However, sometimes their unique anatomy and physiology can make even experienced veterinarians feel out of their comfort zone when dealing with complications. In this session, we will discuss some of the complications that we’ve experienced at one referral hospital, including incisional complications, orthopedic complications, and obstetrical complications.

Anesthesia and Surgery of Pet Pigs

Andrew Niehaus

About the Speaker

Andrew Niehaus, DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Dr Andy Niehaus, associate professor and head of Farm Animal Surgery at Ohio State University, graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in chemical engineering. He got his DVM from Ohio State and he remained at OSU and completed an internship and residency in farm animal surgery and a Master's degree. He is a large animal Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a member of the AABP.

DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Sep 9/18, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
South Room
Pet pigs are gaining popularity in the US and Canada. As such, surgical procedures and routine care that are commonly performed on other pets such as dogs are being frequently performed in pigs. Spays and castrations are among the most commonly performed procedures in pet pigs. Also anesthetic procedures are needed to enable veterinary surgeons to safely and humanely perform these surgeries. However, these animals are not merely a different breed of dog, and there are special anatomic and physiologic differences that can make these procedures challenging. We will discuss some of the important anesthetic and surgical considerations in these animals and will highlight some of the key differences between pigs and more common domestic animals. This session will definitely be of interest to companion animal practitioners as well.

Useful Nerve Blocks for Cattle

Andrew Niehaus

About the Speaker

Andrew Niehaus, DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Dr Andy Niehaus, associate professor and head of Farm Animal Surgery at Ohio State University, graduated from West Virginia University with a degree in chemical engineering. He got his DVM from Ohio State and he remained at OSU and completed an internship and residency in farm animal surgery and a Master's degree. He is a large animal Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a member of the AABP.

DVM, MS, DACVS-LA

Sep 9/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
South Room
Many surgical procedures in cattle are performed without the benefit of general anesthesia. Routine surgeries such as DA correction, C-section, exploratory, dehorning, castrations, and invasive hoof procedures are commonly performed in conscious animals. Nerve blocks are very useful to provide local or regional anesthesia to facilitate surgical procedures or increase animal comfort. Nerve blocks can also be used in conjunction with general anesthesia or sedation to decrease the amount of anesthetic drug required. Although some procedures are quick enough to be performed without a local block, local or regional anesthesia should be considered whenever the pain of the surgical procedure or the post-operative pain of the procedure places unnecessary stress on the animal.

Pain Sensitivity and Healing of Hot Iron Brands in Cattle

Cassandra Tucker

About the Speaker

Cassandra Tucker, PhD

Dr Cassandra Tucker is a professor of Animal Science at UC Davis and the director for the Center for Animal Welfare. She has a PhD from the University of British Columbia and has lived and worked in Canada, New Zealand, Denmark and now the US. She uses animal behavior to gain insight into how cattle perceive their world. This information informs best management practices and housing design.

PhD

Sep 9/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 pm
South Room
Hot-iron branding is widely used for herd identification. Other studies have documented that cattle vocalize, show signs of restlessness and escape attempts during the procedure itself. Little work had documented the pain associated with the brand wounds as they heal. New evidence suggests that these wounds remain painful throughout the healing process (8+ weeks). At least 2 possible practical solutions, a single injection of NSAID or a cooling gel applied at the time of branding, do not hasten healing or affect painfulness of the wounds. Alternatives are needed. These results will be discussed, along with some general consideration of other factors including age of the procedure, as well as the size, shape, and location of brand.

Animal Welfare Assessments for Cow/Calf Operations: Practical Learnings from 30 Ranches

Cassandra Tucker

About the Speaker

Cassandra Tucker, PhD

Dr Cassandra Tucker is a professor of Animal Science at UC Davis and the director for the Center for Animal Welfare. She has a PhD from the University of British Columbia and has lived and worked in Canada, New Zealand, Denmark and now the US. She uses animal behavior to gain insight into how cattle perceive their world. This information informs best management practices and housing design.

PhD

Sep 9/18, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
South Room
Animal welfare assessments are being widely used in other sectors of animal agriculture. We recently developed an assessment for cow-calf operations and used it to examine the health and behavior of beef cows being worked in a chute on 30 California ranches. We found relatively little variation among health outcomes. Injury, lameness and low body condition were all rare. In contrast, we found that ranchers varied considerably in how they handled their animals. For example, some ranchers never used an electric prod, while others used it on 75% of their animals. Using this variation, we identified that cows touched with an electric prod were more likely to balk, vocalize, stumble and fall in the chute, and stumble and run as they exited. In addition to generating knowledge about how management practices affect cattle behavior, we also provided each participating ranch with a benchmarking report, showing them how they compared to the other 29 ranches in the study. These benchmarking results, along with other health and behavioral findings will be discussed.

Animal Welfare and Society: Market-Driven Change

Cassandra Tucker

About the Speaker

Cassandra Tucker, PhD

Dr Cassandra Tucker is a professor of Animal Science at UC Davis and the director for the Center for Animal Welfare. She has a PhD from the University of British Columbia and has lived and worked in Canada, New Zealand, Denmark and now the US. She uses animal behavior to gain insight into how cattle perceive their world. This information informs best management practices and housing design.

PhD

Sep 9/18, 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm
South Room
The largest driver of changes in animal welfare in the US are corporate and industry-led assessment and audit programs. These programs aim to ensure a minimum level of care for food animals. Producer participation comes in two forms: 1) voluntary or 2) because it is required by a component of the supply chain (either a purchaser or a retailer). Outcome-based measures of animal welfare are typically included in the cattle-focused programs. This non-regulatory approach to animal welfare has a number of benefits in terms of widespread and rapid improvements and the ability to update programs on a regular basis. The challenges include 1) the scale of assessment in terms of both number of operations to visit and with what frequency, 2) determining key welfare criteria to include in terms of validity and feasibility 3) ensuring consistency among auditors, and 4) the emergence of competing assurance programs within a sector. These challenges and benefits will be addressed with specific examples.



COMPANION ANIMAL SESSIONS

When the Conversations Are Hard: Managing Challenging Conversations with Companion Animal Clients

Erin Wasson

About the Speaker

Erin Wasson, MSW RSW

Erin Wasson is a registered social worker from the University of Saskatchewan, Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM). She has spent her career working with individuals, couples, groups, and communities as a clinician and resource. Currently, her primary focus is on One Health approaches to social work practice.  These approaches are informed by the intersection of human beings, animals, and environment. Erin’s work also combines relational cultural theory and practice with interventions that explore holistic assessment and intervention. In 2014, Erin implemented Veterinary Social Work services at the WCVM, the first of its kind in Canada. In this role, she provides services to clients of the Veterinary Medical Centre; as well as resources to staff, faculty, and students. Erin has also been active in promoting resilience in the broader community. She seeks to address challenges that arise in human and animal interactions, partnering with veterinary medical associations and animal welfare organizations to facilitate workshops, in-services, and other education events.

MSW RSW

Sep 8/18, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
East Room
With Dr Jordan Woodsworth. Veterinarians are trusted experts for pet owners. Cases can become challenging when the welfare of the animal is compromised by the welfare of the client. When these issues are identified by veterinarians, or clients seek out psycho-social support in order to safely care for their animals, it can feel like you are practicing beyond your scope. As a result, veterinarians should equip themselves with referral information for clients in cases where health is a factor. Having accurate information and clear methods of redirecting clients is key to resolving these issues. As veterinary responsibilities grow, ability to redirect clients is also a step towards preventing or resolving identified human and animal welfare issues. Join Dr. Jordan Woodsworth (BSc, DVM) and Erin Wasson (BSW, MSW, RSW) in discussing how to manage challenging conversations.

Veterinary Forensics: Recognition and Reporting

Margaret Doyle

About the Speaker

Margaret Doyle, DVM, BSc, MVB, MSc, MRCVS

Dr Margaret Doyle provides forensic consulting services for the Calgary Humane Society, the Calgary Police Service and the Alberta SPCA. Through her work with local law enforcement she has been involved in hundreds of animal cruelty cases in the Calgary area from crime scene analysis to providing expert witness testimony in court. Dr Doyle is a certified forensic veterinarian and holds a masters in veterinary forensics from the University of Florida. Dr Doyle is a member of the ABMVA Animal Welfare Committee and through seats on other committees in Calgary she is committed to improving working relationships between law enforcement agencies and the veterinary community. Her goal is the facilitation of better handling of animal cruelty cases to benefit the animals directly and assist in risk assessment utilizing animal cruelty as an indicator for future violent crimes.

DVM, BSc, MVB, MSc, MRCVS

Sep 8/18, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
East Room
Recognizing animal abuse is a difficult thing for veterinarians to do. Lack of training combined with our compassionate natures leaves us frequently blind to potential abuse victims in our practices. This lecture will address factors to increase suspicion of abuse as a diagnosis, as well as how to approach making the diagnosis. We will discuss terminology commonly used in abuse and neglect cases. Mandated reporting creates an obligation in our profession to appropriately report cases of animal abuse in practice. This session will address how to prepare your staff and your practice for reporting. We will discuss possible negative consequences of reporting and balancing these with benefits to society via ‘the link’.

Veterinary Forensics: The Basics

Margaret Doyle

About the Speaker

Margaret Doyle, DVM, BSc, MVB, MSc, MRCVS

Dr Margaret Doyle provides forensic consulting services for the Calgary Humane Society, the Calgary Police Service and the Alberta SPCA. Through her work with local law enforcement she has been involved in hundreds of animal cruelty cases in the Calgary area from crime scene analysis to providing expert witness testimony in court. Dr Doyle is a certified forensic veterinarian and holds a masters in veterinary forensics from the University of Florida. Dr Doyle is a member of the ABMVA Animal Welfare Committee and through seats on other committees in Calgary she is committed to improving working relationships between law enforcement agencies and the veterinary community. Her goal is the facilitation of better handling of animal cruelty cases to benefit the animals directly and assist in risk assessment utilizing animal cruelty as an indicator for future violent crimes.

DVM, BSc, MVB, MSc, MRCVS

Sep 8/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
East Room
Collecting the necessary information and documenting what you find ultimately makes for solid evidence in the prosecution of the offender in court. Veterinarians are essential in helping build that solid case for court in incidences of animal abuse. This session will discuss the live forensic exam and collection of evidence including photography, documentation of findings, and necessary diagnostics specific to legal cases.

Veterinary Forensics: Forensic Necropsy

Margaret Doyle

About the Speaker

Margaret Doyle, DVM, BSc, MVB, MSc, MRCVS

Dr Margaret Doyle provides forensic consulting services for the Calgary Humane Society, the Calgary Police Service and the Alberta SPCA. Through her work with local law enforcement she has been involved in hundreds of animal cruelty cases in the Calgary area from crime scene analysis to providing expert witness testimony in court. Dr Doyle is a certified forensic veterinarian and holds a masters in veterinary forensics from the University of Florida. Dr Doyle is a member of the ABMVA Animal Welfare Committee and through seats on other committees in Calgary she is committed to improving working relationships between law enforcement agencies and the veterinary community. Her goal is the facilitation of better handling of animal cruelty cases to benefit the animals directly and assist in risk assessment utilizing animal cruelty as an indicator for future violent crimes.

DVM, BSc, MVB, MSc, MRCVS

Sep 8/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 pm
East Room
This session will cover the approach to the forensic necropsy. We all have the tools to perform a good necropsy for diagnosis of cause of death. This session will cover a more in-depth approach and discuss drawing conclusions and making interpretations from findings. We will conclude by discussing writing statements for law enforcement, what they want out of your statement, and what will be expected of you in court if you are asked to testify.

Isoxazolines: A New Class of Ectoparasiticides used in Companion Animals

Vincent Defalque

About the Speaker

Vincent Defalque, DVM, DACVD

Dr Vincent Defalque received his veterinary degree from the University of Liege in Belgium in 2001. He then completed a small animal internship at Vet’Agro Sup (formerly known as the National Veterinary School of Lyon) in France followed by a Dermatology Residency program at Michigan State University. He has also worked in the Dermatology Section of the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, one of the busiest veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States. Dr Defalque became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology in 2006. He founded the dermatology department of the Canada West Veterinary Specialists and Critical Care Hospital in Vancouver in 2007 and, more recently, has worked as a Professor of Dermatology at the Ontario Veterinary College (University of Guelph). Dr Defalque is the Immediate Past-President of the Canadian Academy of Veterinary Dermatology, and currently serves as the Canadian representative at the World Association for Veterinary Dermatology. Dr Defalque currently works at North West Veterinary Dermatology Services in Vancouver, BC and St. Albert, AB. His special interests include the diagnosis and management of ear diseases in dogs and cats as well as feline dermatology.

DVM, DACVD

Sep 8/18, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
East Room
Flea and tick infestation is a major health problem in dogs and cats. A new class of veterinary insecticides/acaricides, the isoxazolines, has demonstrated excellent efficacy against them. After covering the differences between isoxazolines and the older oral flea adulticides (including their mechanism of action), we will discuss and compare the isoxazolines currently available in Canada (fluralaner, afoxolaner and sarolaner). Isoxazolines also happen to be effective against numerous other canine and feline external parasites.

Sponsored by Royal Canin



Clinical Consensus Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Canine Demodicosis

Vincent Defalque

About the Speaker

Vincent Defalque, DVM, DACVD

Dr Vincent Defalque received his veterinary degree from the University of Liege in Belgium in 2001. He then completed a small animal internship at Vet’Agro Sup (formerly known as the National Veterinary School of Lyon) in France followed by a Dermatology Residency program at Michigan State University. He has also worked in the Dermatology Section of the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, one of the busiest veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States. Dr Defalque became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology in 2006. He founded the dermatology department of the Canada West Veterinary Specialists and Critical Care Hospital in Vancouver in 2007 and, more recently, has worked as a Professor of Dermatology at the Ontario Veterinary College (University of Guelph). Dr Defalque is the Immediate Past-President of the Canadian Academy of Veterinary Dermatology, and currently serves as the Canadian representative at the World Association for Veterinary Dermatology. Dr Defalque currently works at North West Veterinary Dermatology Services in Vancouver, BC and St. Albert, AB. His special interests include the diagnosis and management of ear diseases in dogs and cats as well as feline dermatology.

DVM, DACVD

Sep 8/18, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
East Room
Demodicosis is a common disease in canine practice caused by a proliferation of Demodex mites. Evidence-based clinical consensus guidelines are now available to all veterinarians. Their purpose is to provide veterinary practitioners with a straightforward description of diagnostics and treatment options in dogs.

Sponsored by Royal Canin



A Practical Approach to Feline Pruritus

Vincent Defalque

About the Speaker

Vincent Defalque, DVM, DACVD

Dr Vincent Defalque received his veterinary degree from the University of Liege in Belgium in 2001. He then completed a small animal internship at Vet’Agro Sup (formerly known as the National Veterinary School of Lyon) in France followed by a Dermatology Residency program at Michigan State University. He has also worked in the Dermatology Section of the Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, one of the busiest veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States. Dr Defalque became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Dermatology in 2006. He founded the dermatology department of the Canada West Veterinary Specialists and Critical Care Hospital in Vancouver in 2007 and, more recently, has worked as a Professor of Dermatology at the Ontario Veterinary College (University of Guelph). Dr Defalque is the Immediate Past-President of the Canadian Academy of Veterinary Dermatology, and currently serves as the Canadian representative at the World Association for Veterinary Dermatology. Dr Defalque currently works at North West Veterinary Dermatology Services in Vancouver, BC and St. Albert, AB. His special interests include the diagnosis and management of ear diseases in dogs and cats as well as feline dermatology.

DVM, DACVD

Sep 8/18, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
East Room
Chronic pruritus is a common reason for consultation in feline dermatology. Different syndromes or "feline skin reaction patterns" (miliary dermatitis, symmetrical alopecia, eosinophilic dermatoses, head and neck pruritus) can be associated with a variety of underlying causes. They will be presented in a didactic way. Various treatment options will be discussed.

Sponsored by Royal Canin



Approach to Immune-Mediated Hypolytic Anemia

Andrew Mackin

About the Speaker

Andrew Mackin, BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Dr Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr Mackin is a 1983 graduate of Murdoch University, and after graduation completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne, followed by an internal medicine residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. Dr Mackin became a Fellow of the ANZCVSc in 1993, and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 1994. Dr Mackin has a clinical and research focus on hematology, hemostasis, immunosuppressive therapy and transfusion medicine.

BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Sep 9/18, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
East Room
Practitioner-oriented diagnostic approach to immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in the dog and cat.

Approach to Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia

Andrew Mackin

About the Speaker

Andrew Mackin, BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Dr Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr Mackin is a 1983 graduate of Murdoch University, and after graduation completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne, followed by an internal medicine residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. Dr Mackin became a Fellow of the ANZCVSc in 1993, and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 1994. Dr Mackin has a clinical and research focus on hematology, hemostasis, immunosuppressive therapy and transfusion medicine.

BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Sep 9/18, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
East Room
Practitioner-oriented diagnostic approach to immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in the dog and cat.

Immunosuppressive Therapy: Better Use of Established Drugs

Andrew Mackin

About the Speaker

Andrew Mackin, BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Dr Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr Mackin is a 1983 graduate of Murdoch University, and after graduation completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne, followed by an internal medicine residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. Dr Mackin became a Fellow of the ANZCVSc in 1993, and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 1994. Dr Mackin has a clinical and research focus on hematology, hemostasis, immunosuppressive therapy and transfusion medicine.

BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Sep 9/18, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
East Room
Discussion of the practical use of the standard established immunosuppressive agents, including cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil and azathioprine.

Immunosuppressive Therapy: What's New

Andrew Mackin

About the Speaker

Andrew Mackin, BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Dr Andrew Mackin is Professor and Head of the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr Mackin is a 1983 graduate of Murdoch University, and after graduation completed an internship and residency in small animal medicine at the University of Melbourne, followed by an internal medicine residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. Dr Mackin became a Fellow of the ANZCVSc in 1993, and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 1994. Dr Mackin has a clinical and research focus on hematology, hemostasis, immunosuppressive therapy and transfusion medicine.

BSc BVMS MVS DVSc DACVIM FANZCVSc

Sep 9/18, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
East Room
Discussion of the practical use of the newer immunosuppressive agents, including cyclosporine, leflunomide and mycophenolate.

Marijuana Toxicosis

Erin Simmonds

About the Speaker

Erin Simmonds, BSc DVM DACVECC

Dr Erin Simmonds attended WCVM and went on to pursue advanced training in emergency and critical care at AVETS in Pittsburgh. After completing her residency in 2011, she moved to Edmonton and is now the medical director and critical care specialist at VCA Canada Guardian Veterinary Centre. She enjoys all aspects of emergency and critical care medicine but has special interest in urethral obstruction in cats, toxicities, trauma, and sepsis.

BSc DVM DACVECC

Sep 9/18, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
East Room
Marijuana/THC toxicosis is becoming an increasing concern for veterinarians as pets are exposed to a variety of recreational and medical marijuana products. We are seeing an increase in the number of cases of toxicity as well as in the severity of toxicity. Ingestions involving concentrated cannabis products (shatter, butter, oil etc) can result in life threatening poisoning. We will discuss routes of exposure, diagnosis, and treatment (including lipid therapy for life threatening toxicity).

Diabetic Emergencies in Dogs and Cats

Erin Simmonds

About the Speaker

Erin Simmonds, BSc DVM DACVECC

Dr Erin Simmonds attended WCVM and went on to pursue advanced training in emergency and critical care at AVETS in Pittsburgh. After completing her residency in 2011, she moved to Edmonton and is now the medical director and critical care specialist at VCA Canada Guardian Veterinary Centre. She enjoys all aspects of emergency and critical care medicine but has special interest in urethral obstruction in cats, toxicities, trauma, and sepsis.

BSc DVM DACVECC

Sep 9/18, 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm
East Room
Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS) are common diabetic emergencies that require intensive medical treatment. At the other end of the spectrum, severe hypoglycemia can be equally life threatening. We will discuss the diagnosis, prognosis, and management options for diabetic crises in both primary care and emergency room/ICU settings.