CE Program & Events


Conference Program at a Glance

 




The 2017 SVMA Conference CE program (1004-29029) is RACE approved by the AAVSB to offer a total of 32.5 CE Credits (19.5 max) being available to any one veterinarian. This approval is valid in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE; however, participants are responsible for ascertaining each board's CE requirements.


Plenary SessionsCompanion Animal SessionsLarge Animal SessionsMorning WellnessMeetingsEvents


Plenary Sessions

Species Spanning Medicine: Veterinary Responses to Animal Cruelty, Abuse and Neglect

Phil Arkow

About the Speaker

Phil Arkow,

Internationally acclaimed lecturer, author and educator Phil Arkow is coordinator of the National LINK Coalition – the National Resource Center on The LINK between Animal Abuse and Human Violence – and edits the monthly LINK-Letter. He chairs the Latham Foundation’s Animal Abuse and Family Violence Prevention Project. He teaches at the University of Florida, the University of Pennsylvania, Harcum College and Camden County College. He has presented over 250 times in 17 countries, 38 states and 9 Canadian provinces, and has authored over 75 key reference works on human-animal interactions and violence prevention. He co-founded the National Link Coalition, the National Animal Control Association, and the Colorado and New Jersey humane federations. He has served with the AVMA, the ASPCA, American Humane, the Delta Society, the Animals & Society Institute, the National Coalition on Violence Against Animals, the National District Attorneys Association, the Academy on Violence & Abuse, and the American Association of Human-Animal Bond Veterinarians. He received a Lifetime Achievement Award from New Jersey Child Assault Prevention.


Sep 8/17, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Tuscany Room
In this insightful 2H talk, Mr Phil Arkow will discuss connections between animal abuse and human violence and dispel some of the myths about risks of abuse reporting.

What Canadian Veterinarians Need to Know and Explain About AMR: A Take Home Tool Kit

John Prescott

About the Speaker

John Prescott, VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

John F. Prescott is a retired veterinary bacteriologist and University Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph. He is probably best known for work on Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals and for promoting better use of antimicrobial drug use in animals. He is an editor and an author of the textbook “Antimicrobial Therapy in Veterinary Medicine”, now in its fifth edition. He was elected a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in 2008. He is currently Co-Chair of the Ad-Hoc Committee for Antimicrobial Stewardship in Canadian Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine.

VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

Sep 8/17, 3:15 pm - 4:15 pm
Tuscany Room
Major changes are underway in how agricultural use of antibiotics is regulated in food animals in Canada. All such use will become veterinary prescription only, growth promotion use of medically important antibiotics and Own Use Importation will stop, and compounding will be more strictly regulated. Veterinarians will need to understand more about AMR so that they can explain to clients what resistance is and why it’s important that these changes have been made, and the national and international context in which they have been made. The talk will provide participants with the tools and resources, including a PowerPoint, to successfully do this as medicine moves into the Age of Antimicrobial Stewardship.

Sponsored by IDEXX



Wellness Cafe: Should you lead with your heart or your head?

Jayne Takahashi

About the Speaker

Jayne Takahashi, DVM, MBA

Dr Jayne Takahashi loves all things communication! Throughout her diverse career, professional communication skills have remained her focus and her passion. Jayne has held a number of positions including companion animal veterinarian, pet nutrition counsellor and educator, national marketing manager in the pet food industry, Vice President of Communications for a network of veterinary practices and currently, a communication consultant and coach for veterinary practices through her company, Communication Leads. The foundation of her communication knowledge and experience is rooted in her experience as a veterinary practitioner, observation of hundreds of scenarios in veterinary practice, formal training with the Institute for Healthcare Communication as well as her experience as an instructional coach for the veterinary students in the Professional Skills program at the Ontario Veterinary College and the University of Calgary College of Veterinary Medicine. Jayne works with veterinary teams and speaks at conferences nationally to improve team dynamics, establish core values and heighten the sensitivity for the pet owner’s perspective.

DVM, MBA

Sep 9/17, 8:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Verde Room
Should You Lead with Your Heart or Your Head? As a member of a veterinary team, you are part of a select group of helping professionals who often provide benefits for others at a cost to yourself. You may not even be aware that you have made this choice until you find yourself struggling with overwhelming practice-related emotions and frustrations. In this session, we poke a little fun at ourselves while we discover the self-talk and perceptions that contribute to this imbalance; identify communication skills to prevent frustrations with clients and colleagues; and review strategies to keep the joy and fulfilment in our careers.

Sponsored by Nestle Purina Pet Care





Companion Animal Sessions

Current Therapy for Canine Chronic Bronchitis

Stephan Carey

About the Speaker

Stephan Carey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Sep 9/17, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Tuscany Room
Chronic bronchitis (CB) is the most common chronic respiratory impairment in dogs. It is characterized by a well-defined cascade of clinical and histologic changes in the airways. The early changes are typically stimulated by an inciting event, and include increases in airway mucus production, impairment of mucociliary clearance, and alterations in the local immune response. If left untreated, chronic bronchitis results in a cycle of chronic inflammation, chronic cough, copious mucoid airway secretions, a loss of airway integrity, and decreased mucociliary clearance. This session will focus on the diagnostic approach and therapeutic management of the patient with chronic bronchitis.

Sponsored by Zoetis



Feline Chronic Nasal Disease: Pathophysiologic Basis of Diagnosis and Therapy

Stephan Carey

About the Speaker

Stephan Carey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Sep 9/17, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Tuscany Room
Idiopathic chronic rhinitis is one of the most common chronic nasal disorders in cats. It is a diagnosis made by exclusion of other disorders, and usually requires chronic management. A therapeutic approach to chronic nasal disease based on feline nasal structure and function will be outlined, with a focus on management options for idiopathic chronic rhinitis that can be done without referral.

Sponsored by Zoetis



Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex: Host, Pathogen and Environmental Interactions

Stephan Carey

About the Speaker

Stephan Carey, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Dr Stephan Carey is Assistant Professor of Small Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. DVM, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2000 Internship, Michigan State University, 2000-2001 Residency, Michigan State University, 2001-2004 CMIB/IT PhD, Michigan State University, 2008 Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Sep 9/17, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Tuscany Room
CIRD, or “kennel cough,” is a complex, highly contagious respiratory infection that is spread primarily through aerosolized respiratory secretions. The interactions between the canine immune system and the classical and emerging respiratory pathogens underlying this disease complex are crucial to disease pathogenesis, and form the basis for current strategies designed to prevent infection and disease.

Sponsored by Zoetis



Antimicrobial Stewardship in Companion Animals: Welcome to a Whole New Era

John Prescott

About the Speaker

John Prescott, VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

John F. Prescott is a retired veterinary bacteriologist and University Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph. He is probably best known for work on Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals and for promoting better use of antimicrobial drug use in animals. He is an editor and an author of the textbook “Antimicrobial Therapy in Veterinary Medicine”, now in its fifth edition. He was elected a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in 2008. He is currently Co-Chair of the Ad-Hoc Committee for Antimicrobial Stewardship in Canadian Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine.

VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

Sep 9/17, 11:30 am - 12:20 pm
Tuscany Room
Untreatable bacterial infections (the ”post-antibiotic era”) are far more likely to emerge in companion animals than in food animals, and have already arrived in the form of the multi-drug resistant (MDR) “ESKAPE” pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius,….. etc). It’s unlikely that we can get the resistance genie back in the bottle but the stewardship approach to antibiotics will buy time until we have new antibiotics and new approaches to controlling bacterial infections. Antibiotic stewardship is a multistep approach of different sizes involving continuous improvement in how we use antibiotics, taking a “5R” focus on responsibility, reduction, replacement, refinement and review. This talk discusses the many steps that veterinarians can use to promote stewardship in companion animal practice. Some excellent practical resources in this area will be presented and discussed.

Sponsored by IDEXX



Practical Analgesia and Anesthesia in Exotic Pets, Part I

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Tuscany Room
This lecture will focus on clinically relevant anatomy and physiology related to anesthesia in birds, small mammals and reptiles. We will then discuss preparation, monitoring, and specific anesthesia protocols for each group. (First of two parts)

Practical Analgesia and Anesthesia in Exotic Pets, Part II

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Tuscany Room
This lecture will focus on clinically relevant anatomy and physiology related to anesthesia in birds, small mammals and reptiles. We will then discuss preparation, monitoring, and specific anesthesia protocols for each group. (Second of two parts)

Common Emergencies of Exotic Pets, Part I

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
Tuscany Room
This lecture will discuss the presentation, pathophysiology and treatment of common emergencies seen in exotic pets. A helpful list of differential diagnoses for common problems will be presented. (First of two parts)

Common Emergencies of Exotic Pets, Part II

James Morrisey

About the Speaker

James Morrisey, DVM, DAVPAP

Dr James Morrisey is a senior lecturer in the Zoological Medicine Section of the Department of Clinical Sciences at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. 1995-1997 Animal Medical Center, New York, NY, Residency in Exotic Pet Medicine and Surgery. 1994-1995 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, Internship in Exotic Pet, Wildlife and Zoological Medicine. 1992 Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, DVM.

DVM, DAVPAP

Sep 9/17, 5:00 pm - 5:50 pm
Tuscany Room
This lecture will discuss the presentation, pathophysiology and treatment of common emergencies seen in exotic pets. A helpful list of differential diagnoses for common problems will be presented. (Second of two parts)

“Ears looking at you” Diagnosis and Treatment of Canine Otitis Externa

Charlie Pye

About the Speaker

Charlie Pye, BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Dr Charlie Pye grew up outside of London, England and moved to Prince Edward Island, which she now calls home, at the age of eighteen. There she attended the University of Prince Edward Island where she completed a three-year BSc undergraduate degree majoring in Biology. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the Atlantic Veterinary College, PEI. She then moved to Saskatoon to complete a one-year rotating internship at the WCVM. Following her internship,she travelled back across the country for a Dermatology Residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. While at OVC, she also completed her Doctorate of Veterinary Science degree specializing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms. After completing her residency she began working at Guelph Veterinary Speciality Hospital with the rest of the dermatology team. She also continues to travel back home to teach the veterinary students at the Atlantic Veterinary College, where she is now an Adjunct Professor. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Zumba, reading, and spending time with her partner Andrew and her three cats and 2 terriers (both of which have allergies)!

BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Sep 10/17, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Tuscany Room
Otitis externa (OE) is inflammation of the external ear canal; a common condition in small animals. OE is due to primary, predisposing and perpetuating factors. Primary factors account for the underlying etiology, predisposing factors are present prior to the development of the otitis and perpetuating factors occur as a result of the inflammation and include fungal and bacterial infections. The most commonly isolated pathogens in cases of infectious canine OE are Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Malassezia pachydermatis. With it’s multifactorial nature, OE can be a frustrating disease to treat. We will review diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

Sponsored by Royal Canin



"You are what you eat!" Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergies in Companion Animals

Charlie Pye

About the Speaker

Charlie Pye, BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Dr Charlie Pye grew up outside of London, England and moved to Prince Edward Island, which she now calls home, at the age of eighteen. There she attended the University of Prince Edward Island where she completed a three-year BSc undergraduate degree majoring in Biology. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the Atlantic Veterinary College, PEI. She then moved to Saskatoon to complete a one-year rotating internship at the WCVM. Following her internship,she travelled back across the country for a Dermatology Residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. While at OVC, she also completed her Doctorate of Veterinary Science degree specializing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms. After completing her residency she began working at Guelph Veterinary Speciality Hospital with the rest of the dermatology team. She also continues to travel back home to teach the veterinary students at the Atlantic Veterinary College, where she is now an Adjunct Professor. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Zumba, reading, and spending time with her partner Andrew and her three cats and 2 terriers (both of which have allergies)!

BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Sep 10/17, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Tuscany Room
Food allergies (cutaneous adverse food reactions) can manifest as pruritus, recurrent secondary infections, alopecia, erythema and up to 32% of patients will present with concurrent gastrointestinal signs. The majority of animals developing cutaneous adverse food reactions have been on a diet containing the offending allergen for years. This can make diagnosis difficult. To date, there is a lack of correlation between clinical food allergy and laboratory tests for food allergies. Confirmation of food allergy can only be determined by a novel protein/ hydrolyzed restriction diet trial. We will review clinical signs and management of food allergies in companion animals.

Sponsored by Royal Canin



“I’ve tried X, Y and Z…Why is nothing working?” Common Reasons for Dermatologic Treatment Failures

Charlie Pye

About the Speaker

Charlie Pye, BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Dr Charlie Pye grew up outside of London, England and moved to Prince Edward Island, which she now calls home, at the age of eighteen. There she attended the University of Prince Edward Island where she completed a three-year BSc undergraduate degree majoring in Biology. She went on to receive her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine from the Atlantic Veterinary College, PEI. She then moved to Saskatoon to complete a one-year rotating internship at the WCVM. Following her internship,she travelled back across the country for a Dermatology Residency at the Ontario Veterinary College. While at OVC, she also completed her Doctorate of Veterinary Science degree specializing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms. After completing her residency she began working at Guelph Veterinary Speciality Hospital with the rest of the dermatology team. She also continues to travel back home to teach the veterinary students at the Atlantic Veterinary College, where she is now an Adjunct Professor. In her spare time she enjoys teaching Zumba, reading, and spending time with her partner Andrew and her three cats and 2 terriers (both of which have allergies)!

BSc, DVM, DVSc, DACVID

Sep 10/17, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Tuscany Room
Frustration can arise when treatment instituted for a particular dermatologic disease fails to lead to clinical improvement. Other cases may initially improve, but then show a decline in their condition. Secondary infections, development of another disease or adverse drug reactions can all lead to presumed treatment failure. In these cases of “treatment failure”, diagnostic steps should always be revisited, however, further diagnostics are also likely needed.

Sponsored by Royal Canin



Local Anesthetics and Local Anesthetic Techniques

Cate Creighton

About the Speaker

Cate Creighton, DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Dr Cate Creighton graduated from Atlantic Veterinary College and was a mixed animal clinician in New England for nine years prior to becoming a small animal clinician in Nova Scotia. She was an anesthetist at AVC before pursuing her MSc/anesthesia residency. She then worked at The University of Adelaide, helping to develop the didactic and clinical teaching program of the new DVM course. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2012. She returned to AVC in 2013, where she teaches and provides clinical anesthesia service to small and large animals. She is an avid mountain biker.

DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Sep 10/17, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Tuscany Room
While most clinicians recognize that local and regional anesthetic techniques are useful, not everyone is comfortable using them. This session is designed to provide an overview of local anesthetics and their common use in local and regional blocks, to improve clinician comfort in using them. A very brief pain physiology review and reminder of pain treatment strategies is included. The pharmacology of local anesthetics is covered, and several local anesthetic techniques are described. Some case examples are used throughout the session, and audience participation is encouraged.

Pain Physiology and Recognition

Cate Creighton

About the Speaker

Cate Creighton, DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Dr Cate Creighton graduated from Atlantic Veterinary College and was a mixed animal clinician in New England for nine years prior to becoming a small animal clinician in Nova Scotia. She was an anesthetist at AVC before pursuing her MSc/anesthesia residency. She then worked at The University of Adelaide, helping to develop the didactic and clinical teaching program of the new DVM course. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2012. She returned to AVC in 2013, where she teaches and provides clinical anesthesia service to small and large animals. She is an avid mountain biker.

DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Sep 10/17, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
Tuscany Room
Recognition of pain can be very challenging in animals. This session provides a brief reminder of the importance of pain management, as well as a detailed review of pain physiology and sensitization. The rationale for providing pre emptive analgesia when possible is covered. Principles of pain recognition in animals and pain scales in several species are discussed in detail.

CRIs During Anesthesia

Cate Creighton

About the Speaker

Cate Creighton, DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Dr Cate Creighton graduated from Atlantic Veterinary College and was a mixed animal clinician in New England for nine years prior to becoming a small animal clinician in Nova Scotia. She was an anesthetist at AVC before pursuing her MSc/anesthesia residency. She then worked at The University of Adelaide, helping to develop the didactic and clinical teaching program of the new DVM course. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Anesthesia and Analgesia in 2012. She returned to AVC in 2013, where she teaches and provides clinical anesthesia service to small and large animals. She is an avid mountain biker.

DVM, MSc, DACVAA

Sep 10/17, 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm
Tuscany Room
Constant rate infusions (CRIs) can improve the quality of anesthesia for many of our patients, in terms of both physiologic parameters and analgesia. This session is designed to improve clinician comfort with using CRIs during anesthesia. The rationale for including CRIs is discussed, as well as a brief review of pain management strategies. The pharmacology of drugs that are commonly used as CRIs during anesthesia is covered. Several methods to include CRIs are described. Some case examples are included, and audience participation is encouraged.



Large Animal Sessions

CFIA CWD Voluntary Herd Certification Program Accreditation

About the Speaker

,



Sep 8/17, 4:30 pm - 5:15 pm
Tuscany Room
CFIA is accrediting Veterinarians on the CWD Voluntary Herd Certification Program to allow them to work with their cervid producer clients that are enrolled in the VHCP program. Large and mixed animal veterinarians with cervid producer clients are invited to attend this special 45 minute accreditation session.

Demographics and Health Status of Geriatric Horses

Katharina Lohmann

About the Speaker

Katharina Lohmann, DVM, DACVIM

Dr Lohmann is a graduate of the Free University in Berlin, Germany, is board-certified in large animal internal medicine (ACVIM-LA), and received a PhD from the University of Georgia. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the WCVM and contributes to the internal medicine service at the Veterinary Medical Centre’s Large Animal Clinic. She also teaches in the WCVM’s veterinary communications curriculum. Dr Lohmann’s recent areas of research include equine infectious anemia and recurrent airway obstruction in horses.

DVM, DACVIM

Sep 9/17, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Lombardy Room
The demographics of the horse population are changing and the geriatric horse plays an increasing role in veterinary practice. This presentation reviews the current knowledge of physiologic changes in the aging equine and their impact on general management practices such as vaccination and deworming. Disease prevalence in geriatric horses, prognostic factors for common conditions such as colic, and owner attitudes towards treatment and euthanasia are also discussed.

Selected Health Concerns of the Geriatric Horse

Katharina Lohmann

About the Speaker

Katharina Lohmann, DVM, DACVIM

Dr Lohmann is a graduate of the Free University in Berlin, Germany, is board-certified in large animal internal medicine (ACVIM-LA), and received a PhD from the University of Georgia. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the WCVM and contributes to the internal medicine service at the Veterinary Medical Centre’s Large Animal Clinic. She also teaches in the WCVM’s veterinary communications curriculum. Dr Lohmann’s recent areas of research include equine infectious anemia and recurrent airway obstruction in horses.

DVM, DACVIM

Sep 9/17, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Lombardy Room
The first part of this presentation focuses on weight maintenance and weight loss in geriatric horses. The diagnostic approach to weight loss and common conditions causing weight loss are discussed. Nutritional requirements and feeding strategies as well as common dental disorders in aging horses are also reviewed. In the second part of the presentation, an update on the diagnostic testing and treatment for pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID, Equine Cushings Disease) is provided.

Outpacing the Resistance Tsunami: Antimicrobial Stewardship in Equine Medicine

John Prescott

About the Speaker

John Prescott, VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

John F. Prescott is a retired veterinary bacteriologist and University Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph. He is probably best known for work on Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals and for promoting better use of antimicrobial drug use in animals. He is an editor and an author of the textbook “Antimicrobial Therapy in Veterinary Medicine”, now in its fifth edition. He was elected a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences in 2008. He is currently Co-Chair of the Ad-Hoc Committee for Antimicrobial Stewardship in Canadian Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine.

VetMB, PhD, FCHAS

Sep 9/17, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Lombardy Room
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is not on most equine practitioner’s radar. However, AMR is emerging as an important issue in equine medicine. This talk will show how equine veterinarians can take a very practical approach to antimicrobial stewardship in equine medicine, and provides a clear framework for understanding how we can use antibiotics better, and how we address and prevent the emergence and spread of resistance in equine practice. Some excellent practical resources in this area will be presented and discussed.

Sponsored by IDEXX



Troubleshooting Micronutrient Status in Cow-Calf Herds

Cheryl Waldner

About the Speaker

Cheryl Waldner, DVM, PhD

Dr Cheryl Waldner is a professor in Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. She is part of the outbreak investigation unit and is actively involved in research examining factors affecting the productivity of cow-calf herds in Western Canada. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial use and resistance as well as the prevention and control of infectious diseases such as BVDV, vibrio, trichomoniasis, and neospora. She has also examined the effects of trace mineral and vitamin nutrition on reproductive performance in cow-calf herds. Dr Waldner has more than 170 peer-reviewed publications. Cheryl and her husband own and operate a small commercial cow-calf herd west of Saskatoon.

DVM, PhD

Sep 9/17, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Lombardy Room
Trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies are common concerns among cow-calf producers. However, developing cost-effective supplementation programs can be challenging especially for large extensively managed herds. This presentation will review the most likely and most important micronutrient problems in western Canada. The discussion will concentrate on a practical step-wise approach to investigating micronutrient supplementation in cow-calf herds.

Investigating Poor Reproductive Performance in Beef Cows

Cheryl Waldner

About the Speaker

Cheryl Waldner, DVM, PhD

Dr Cheryl Waldner is a professor in Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. She is part of the outbreak investigation unit and is actively involved in research examining factors affecting the productivity of cow-calf herds in Western Canada. She is particularly interested in antimicrobial use and resistance as well as the prevention and control of infectious diseases such as BVDV, vibrio, trichomoniasis, and neospora. She has also examined the effects of trace mineral and vitamin nutrition on reproductive performance in cow-calf herds. Dr Waldner has more than 170 peer-reviewed publications. Cheryl and her husband own and operate a small commercial cow-calf herd west of Saskatoon.

DVM, PhD

Sep 9/17, 1:30 pm - 2:20 pm
Lombardy Room
A good pregnancy rate is the first and often the most important determinant of a good calf crop. But depending on bull management, being pregnant alone might not be sufficient for good performance. Cows need to conceive as soon as possible after first bull contact. This presentation will discuss recent benchmarks for assessing reproductive performance from western Canada. The presentation will focus on cost-effective diagnostics when reproductive performance does not meet our expectations. What diagnostic options are most likely to help identify the cause when investigating herd problems?

Small Flock Poultry Disease Basics

Victoria Bowes

About the Speaker

Victoria Bowes, DVM, DACPV

Dr Bowes graduated in 1987 with a DVM from the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ontario, followed by an MSc in Avian Pathology in 1988. She has been board certified with the American College of Poultry Veterinarians (ACPV) since 1992 and has recently finished her tenure as is the Western Director of the American Association of Avian Pathologists (AAAP). She is the newly appointed chair of the AAAP Small Flock Poultry Committee. She is a member of the Association of Avian Veterinarians (AAV) and has been a CVMA member since 1987. Dr Bowes has spent the last 28 years employed at the Provincial Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Abbotsford, BC as a specialist pathologist with expertise in Avian Pathology. The diagnostic caseload involves disease investigations in all species of birds (wild, pet, zoological and poultry). Dr. Bowes has been directly involved in the detection, outbreak management and industry recovery efforts for 4 outbreaks of notifiable Avian Influenza in the last 12 years and is currently involved in several post-AI recovery initiatives including outreach and veterinary support to small flock owners. She lives on a small acreage in Bradner, BC and fully enjoys the daily challenge of rescuing her garden from slugs and her chickens from coyotes.

DVM, DACPV

Sep 9/17, 2:30 pm - 3:20 pm
Lombardy Room
This session will provide an introduction to the unique disease challenges facing small flock poultry. It is designed to provide an overview of poultry production in Canada and the context in which small flock poultry can co-exist with commercial production. Understanding the various motivations to keep small flock poultry assists the veterinarian in guiding successful VCPRs. The remaining focus of this session will be how specialized avian anatomy relates to the unique diseases of poultry and the various factors that can influence the expression of disease within a flock. The most common small flock diseases will be discussed (egg production drops, Marek’s Disease, mites, coccidiosis, Mycoplasma gallisepticum).

Keeping the Small Poultry Flock Healthy

Victoria Bowes

About the Speaker

Victoria Bowes, DVM, DACPV

Dr Bowes graduated in 1987 with a DVM from the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ontario, followed by an MSc in Avian Pathology in 1988. She has been board certified with the American College of Poultry Veterinarians (ACPV) since 1992 and has recently finished her tenure as is the Western Director of the American Association of Avian Pathologists (AAAP). She is the newly appointed chair of the AAAP Small Flock Poultry Committee. She is a member of the Association of Avian Veterinarians (AAV) and has been a CVMA member since 1987. Dr Bowes has spent the last 28 years employed at the Provincial Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Abbotsford, BC as a specialist pathologist with expertise in Avian Pathology. The diagnostic caseload involves disease investigations in all species of birds (wild, pet, zoological and poultry). Dr. Bowes has been directly involved in the detection, outbreak management and industry recovery efforts for 4 outbreaks of notifiable Avian Influenza in the last 12 years and is currently involved in several post-AI recovery initiatives including outreach and veterinary support to small flock owners. She lives on a small acreage in Bradner, BC and fully enjoys the daily challenge of rescuing her garden from slugs and her chickens from coyotes.

DVM, DACPV

Sep 9/17, 4:00 pm - 4:50 pm
Lombardy Room
This session will provide an introduction to the principles of small flock poultry health management, including disease prevention strategies such as vaccination and practical biosecurity, on-site flock husbandry assessments using the FLAWS system (Feed, Litter, Air, Water, Space), practical treatment options (and challenges) and disease event management guidelines.

Small Flock Poultry Zoonosis/ Food Safety

Victoria Bowes

About the Speaker

Victoria Bowes, DVM, DACPV

Dr Bowes graduated in 1987 with a DVM from the Ontario Veterinary College in Guelph, Ontario, followed by an MSc in Avian Pathology in 1988. She has been board certified with the American College of Poultry Veterinarians (ACPV) since 1992 and has recently finished her tenure as is the Western Director of the American Association of Avian Pathologists (AAAP). She is the newly appointed chair of the AAAP Small Flock Poultry Committee. She is a member of the Association of Avian Veterinarians (AAV) and has been a CVMA member since 1987. Dr Bowes has spent the last 28 years employed at the Provincial Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Abbotsford, BC as a specialist pathologist with expertise in Avian Pathology. The diagnostic caseload involves disease investigations in all species of birds (wild, pet, zoological and poultry). Dr. Bowes has been directly involved in the detection, outbreak management and industry recovery efforts for 4 outbreaks of notifiable Avian Influenza in the last 12 years and is currently involved in several post-AI recovery initiatives including outreach and veterinary support to small flock owners. She lives on a small acreage in Bradner, BC and fully enjoys the daily challenge of rescuing her garden from slugs and her chickens from coyotes.

DVM, DACPV

Sep 9/17, 5:00 pm - 5:50 pm
Lombardy Room
Although relatively uncommon, poultry can be the source of several zoonotic pathogens for humans. This session will provide an overview of the role of poultry in recent human outbreaks of Salmonella and Campylobacter, and safe egg handling guidelines for the small flock. Reportable poultry diseases and the context of Avian Influenza for small flocks will be discussed.

Establishing Diagnosis in Cattle: Physical Exam, Part I

Allen Roussel

About the Speaker

Allen Roussel, DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Dr Allen Roussel has been a faculty member at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University for 31 years. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and one of the few American diplomates of the European College of Bovine Health Management. He has always thought that arriving at a diagnosis was the most exciting and most important part of veterinary medicine. When he is not working at his day job, he's usually working or playing in his second home, France.

DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Sep 10/17, 8:00 am - 8:50 am
Lombardy Room
The first step in treating an animal is establishing a diagnosis. Although we have remarkable ancillary diagnostic aids available to us now, diagnosis begins with a physical examination. The attendee will learn, or relearn, how to perform a thorough physical examination, which will allow him/her to make appropriate and efficient use of the many diagnostic modalities that can confirm and refine the preliminary diagnosis. (First of two parts)

Establishing Diagnosis in Cattle: Physical Exam, Part II

Allen Roussel

About the Speaker

Allen Roussel, DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Dr Allen Roussel has been a faculty member at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University for 31 years. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and one of the few American diplomates of the European College of Bovine Health Management. He has always thought that arriving at a diagnosis was the most exciting and most important part of veterinary medicine. When he is not working at his day job, he's usually working or playing in his second home, France.

DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Sep 10/17, 9:00 am - 9:50 am
Lombardy Room
The first step in treating an animal is establishing a diagnosis. Although we have remarkable ancillary diagnostic aids available to us now, diagnosis begins with a physical examination. The attendee will learn, or relearn, how to perform a thorough physical examination, which will allow him/her to make appropriate and efficient use of the many diagnostic modalities that can confirm and refine the preliminary diagnosis.(Second of two parts)

Establishing Diagnosis in Cattle: Laboratory Data, Part I

Allen Roussel

About the Speaker

Allen Roussel, DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Dr Allen Roussel has been a faculty member at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University for 31 years. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and one of the few American diplomates of the European College of Bovine Health Management. He has always thought that arriving at a diagnosis was the most exciting and most important part of veterinary medicine. When he is not working at his day job, he's usually working or playing in his second home, France.

DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Sep 10/17, 10:30 am - 11:20 am
Lombardy Room
Analytical testing of serum from veterinary patients is widely available at point of care, in the clinic or at reference laboratories. It is important to know which tests are appropriate to request and how to interpret the results in the context of the case. In this session, the attendee will build upon the diagnostic skills acquired in the previous sessions, learn how to select laboratory tests based on history and physical examination and learn how to interpret those tests along with the history and physical examination findings to establish a diagnosis. (First of two parts)

Establishing Diagnosis in Cattle: Laboratory Data, Part II

Allen Roussel

About the Speaker

Allen Roussel, DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Dr Allen Roussel has been a faculty member at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M University for 31 years. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and one of the few American diplomates of the European College of Bovine Health Management. He has always thought that arriving at a diagnosis was the most exciting and most important part of veterinary medicine. When he is not working at his day job, he's usually working or playing in his second home, France.

DVM, MSc, DACVIM, DECBHM

Sep 10/17, 11:30 am - 12:20 am
Lombardy Room
Analytical testing of serum from veterinary patients is widely available at point of care, in the clinic or at reference laboratories. It is important to know which tests are appropriate to request and how to interpret the results in the context of the case. In this session, the attendee will build upon the diagnostic skills acquired in the previous sessions, learn how to select laboratory tests based on history and physical examination and learn how to interpret those tests along with the history and physical examination findings to establish a diagnosis. (Second of two parts)

Effective Stockmanship: A Dimension of Beef Production Management

Tom Noffsinger

About the Speaker

Tom Noffsinger, DVM

Dr Tom Noffsinger was raised on a ranch in Eastern Colorado and attended CSU. Education: 1973 graduate at CSU--DVM, BS Animal Science, Upjohn Award; 1994 Graduate—Beef Production Management Series –Great Plains Veterinary Education Center—UNL. Activities and Awards: 2001 Consultant of the Year—Academy Veterinary Consultants; NVMA—Distinguished Service Award, Member of Board of Directors; 2008 AABP Merial Preventative Medicine Award—Beef; Member of AVMA, NVMA. AVC, AABP, and Max United Methodist Church; Advisory Board Member—Intervet, Pfizer, Bayer, Elanco; Academy of Veterinary Consultants Board Member; Past President of Academy of Veterinary Consultants.

DVM

Sep 10/17, 2:00 pm - 2:50 pm
Lombardy Room
A Summary of basic Stockmanship Concepts will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the use of these concepts to enhance cattle health, attitude, and performance. Examples of caregiver-cattle interactions from conception to harvest with video examples will be discussed.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health



BRD Case Definition

Tom Noffsinger

About the Speaker

Tom Noffsinger, DVM

Dr Tom Noffsinger was raised on a ranch in Eastern Colorado and attended CSU. Education: 1973 graduate at CSU--DVM, BS Animal Science, Upjohn Award; 1994 Graduate—Beef Production Management Series –Great Plains Veterinary Education Center—UNL. Activities and Awards: 2001 Consultant of the Year—Academy Veterinary Consultants; NVMA—Distinguished Service Award, Member of Board of Directors; 2008 AABP Merial Preventative Medicine Award—Beef; Member of AVMA, NVMA. AVC, AABP, and Max United Methodist Church; Advisory Board Member—Intervet, Pfizer, Bayer, Elanco; Academy of Veterinary Consultants Board Member; Past President of Academy of Veterinary Consultants.

DVM

Sep 10/17, 3:00 pm - 3:50 pm
Lombardy Room
Detection of cattle with respiratory disease will be reviewed.  An electronic system used for lung auscultation that categorizes cases by severity will be demonstrated.  Application of this system for hospital and home pen management will be presented.

Sponsored by Merck Animal Health





Morning Wellness

Wake up! Zumba

About the Speaker

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Sep 9/17, 6:00 am - 6:45 am
Piero Room
Our own Dr Leah Frei is excited to lead SVMA's first Zumba class. This one will really start your engines: nothing wakes you up and invigorates the body like Zumba!

Sunrise Yoga

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Sep 10/17, 6:00 am - 6:45 am
Second Floor Window Area
Join Lori from Yoga Haven for 45 minutes of morning refreshment- a great way to reinvigorate yourself for your last conference day.



Meetings

SVMA Annual General Meeting

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Sep 8/17, 8:30 am - 11:30 am
Tuscany Room
As members of a self-regulated profession, we all have an obligation to participate in the decision-making process of our governance. Our profession moves forward in directions reflective of member viewpoints only if we make our opinions heard. Make sure to include the AGM on your conference schedule. No registration is required- all members welcome for the AGM and Members' Forum Lunch following.

Members' Forum & Lunch

About the Speaker

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Sep 8/17, 11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Tuscany Room
Members are invited to take the microphone for a candid discussion forum with SVMA Council. Lunch will be served; there is no registration required.



Events

Annual SVMA Awards Night Banquet

About the Speaker

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Sep 8/17, 5:30 pm - 10:00 pm
Telegraph Room - Casino Regina
This is the biggest night of the year for the Saskatchewan veterinary profession! Casino Regina will be the hot spot on the evening of September 8th for the 2017 SVMA Awards Night Banquet. Delicious fare and libations, awards, tributes and a few surprises are on the menu. Cocktails 5:30 pm, dinner service 6:30 pm.

Sponsored by Petplan



Exhibitors' Reception

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Sep 9/17, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Exhibit Hall - Trentino Room
Join your colleagues for cocktails and networking as you peruse the many new products and services our 2017 Exhibitors have on display. Dinner buffet served.

Sponsored by Dechra Veterinary Products, Naylor Canada and WDDC